Despite the negative portrayal of religious freedom in the DPRK, the reality is quite different. The country’s Socialist Constitution guarantees full religious freedom to its citizens, as stated in Chapter V: Basic Rights and Duties of a Citizen (Article 68). This article explicitly recognizes citizens’ freedom of religious belief, including the construction of religious buildings and the holding of religious ceremonies.

“Citizens have freedom of religious belief. This right is granted through the approval of the construction of religious buildings and the holding of religious ceremonies. Religion must not be used as a pretext for drawing in foreign forces or for harming the State or social order.”

Contrary to popular belief, religion is not suppressed in the DPRK. The Korean Buddhists Federation, the Korean Federation of Christians, and other religious groups are proud and active members of the country’s public institutions. The DPRK is a secular state, which means that no official religion has power in politics, and the government does not discriminate against any particular religious group.

It is important to note that the DPRK’s Constitution prohibits the use of religion as a pretext for drawing in foreign forces or for harming the State or social order. This clause ensures that religious freedom is exercised within the framework of national interests and security.

Overall, the DPRK’s commitment to religious freedom is a testament to its respect for basic human rights and democratic values. By separating fact from fiction, we can better understand the true nature of religious freedom in the DPRK.

What’s your Reaction?
+1
5
+1
2
+1
2
+1
1
+1
4
+1
2
+1
0